Davidson Institute - 2002 Annual Report


This is a report of the progress made in 2002 toward achieving the Davidson Institute's mission to recognize, nurture and support profoundly intelligent young people and to provide opportunities for them to develop their talents to make a positive difference.

In pursuit of this mission, the Institute delivered the following programs, services, and publications:


Davidson Young Scholars
An individualized, family-oriented program aimed at nurturing profoundly gifted young people.

Number of Young Scholars Selected in 2002
71 new Davidson Young Scholars were selected and enrolled in the program.

Total Number of Young Scholars Currently Enrolled
164 Davidson Young Scholars (55 females; 109 males) from 34 states representing a variety of economic, racial and ethnic groups. 

Types of Services Provided
The services provided to the Davidson Young Scholars included:

  • Free consulting services with each Davidson Young Scholar family
  • Assistance with locating appropriate educational settings and materials, advocates, counselors, and mentors
  • Access to professionals in areas such as parenting, schooling, talent development, assessment, etc.
  • Connections with peers for Davidson Young Scholars and their parents
  • Connections with PG adults who have developed their talents to make a positive contribution to society
  • Online Book Discussion Groups for Davidson Young Scholars
  • Online seminars for Davidson Young Scholars
  • Group and topic specific list serves for Davidson Young Scholars and their parents
  • Financial Assistance (based upon need) to implement the Davidson Young Scholars Action Plan
  • Online Seminars for Parents on the Following Topics:
    • Monica Andis - Food Selectivity
    • Jim Delisle - Socialization and the Profoundly Gifted (PG) Child
    • Miraca Gross - Radical Acceleration
    • Sharon Lind - Parenting the Introverted Child
    • Carol Martin - SAT Prep for Gifted
    • Kara McGoey - Cool, Calm & Collected: Managing Classroom Behaviors
    • Betty Meckstroth - Parenting the 'Perfectionist' Child
    • Maureen Neihart - Resiliency
    • Jon Reider - Early College Preparation
    • Sylvia Rimm - Highly Gifted Girls
    • Karen Rogers - Preparing Schools for Your Child
    • Esther Sinclair - Advocacy
    • Mary Ann Swiatek - Social Experiences of Gifted Adolescents
    • Meredith Warshaw - Meeting the needs of Twice-Exceptional PG Students
    • Tom West - Dyslexia and Talent
  • Young Scholar Reunion Gathering, “Imagine the Possibilities” was held in June in Golden, Colorado at the Colorado School of Mines.
  • Davidson Young Scholars Tahoe Gathering, “Reach for the Stars” was held, for new enrollees, in August.

Young Scholars Program Results Achieved
An annual evaluation of the Davidson Young Scholars program was conducted in October, 2002; over 80% the families participated in the survey.

Young Scholar families rated the following major program components for their effectiveness:

  • The Family Consultant Team as partners to assist in locating resources – 95% rated as Effective
  • The Family Consultant Team as partners to assist with educational advocacy – 94% rated as Effective
  • The Family Consultant Team as partners to assist with talent development – 93% rated as Effective
  • Action Plan, as a tool for addressing the Young Scholars strengths and areas of need – 78% rated as Effective
  • Action Plan, the creation, implementation and maintenance process – 75% rated as Effective
  • Homeschooling Framework: As a tool for meeting your child's academic needs – 83% rated as Effective
  • Electronic Mailing Lists and Broadcasts: As a medium for receiving program updates and information – 98% rated as Effective
  • Electronic Mailing Lists and Broadcasts: as a medium for connecting with other Young Scholar families – 87% rated as Effective
  • Private Bulletin Board, as a way to connect with other Young Scholar families – 55% rated as Effective
  • Private Website, as a way to receive program updates and information – 95% rated as Effective
  • Private Website, as a way to connect with and learn about other program participants – 93% rated as Effective
  • Online Seminars, as an opportunity to learn valuable information – 94% rated as Effective
  • Online Seminars, as an opportunity to connect with experts in the field – 94% rated as Effective
  • The Gatherings, as an opportunity to learn valuable information – 94% rated as Effective
  • The Gatherings, as a way to connect with other program participants – 98% rated as Effective
  • Davidson Gifted Database, as a convenient, helpful bank of resources – 99% rated as Effective
  • Davidson Gifted Database: As a convenient way to access articles – 99% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholar Monthly Challenges – 89% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholar Book Clubs – 40% rated as Effective

Direct Service Effectiveness Statements

  • Family consultant team as a knowledgeable, supportive sounding board – 99% rated as Effective
  • Providing assistance in advocating for young scholars with schools and programs – 93% rated as Effective
  • Providing assistance in locating and examining a continuum of challenging and appropriate learning environments – 92% rated as Effective
  • Helping parents to determine an organizational structure, namely through the development/implementation of an action plan/home schooling framework. – 90% rated as Effective
  • Providing opportunities for parents and young scholars to connect with true peers – 90% rated as Effective
  • Providing assistance with the location of resources – 94% rated as Effective
  • Providing links to experts in the field – 98% rated as Effective
  • Providing assistance with assessment – 92% rated as Effective
  • Family Consultant's ability to provide a warm, caring individualized relationship – 100% rated as Effective

The program participants indicated their level of agreement with the following benefit statements:
As a direct result of participation in the Davidson Young Scholars program, my child . . .

  • Is now in an academic environment that is better suited to his/her abilities – 91% agree
  • Has an improved level of self-confidence – 93% agreed
  • Is now working to develop his/her interests/talents – 84% agreed
  • Has developed at least one friendship with another Young Scholar – 90% agreed
  • Has shown an interest in using his/her abilities to make a positive difference – 85% agreed
  • Has improved self-advocacy skills – 77% agreed

As a direct result of participation as a Young Scholar parent, I feel more confident in my ability to:

  • Advocate for my child – 94% agreed
  • Parent my child – 91% agreed
  • Locate resources for my child – 95% agreed
  • Identify my child's strengths and needs – 93% agreed
  • Address my child's strengths and needs – 93% agreed

Areas of Service
The following information was gathered from our Family Consultants and indicates the number of requests made by Young Scholar families for assistance in the following areas:

  • Assessment Consultation & Assistance – 44
  • Assistance in locating Professionals for Social/Emotional Support – 81
  • Creation of a Home Schooling Academic Framework – 16
  • Educational Advocacy – 138
  • Financial Assistance – 107
  • Home Schooling Support – 65
  • Talent Development & Academic Enrichment – 93
  • Tuition Assistance – 77
  • Early College Assistance – 10

Guidebook Distribution

  • Advocacy Guidebook – 83
  • Early College Guidebook – 61
  • Learning Partnership Guidebook – 11 (available October 2002)

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Davidson Fellows Awards
Recognizes the outstanding achievements of highly gifted young people and awards scholarships annually to students up to age 18.

Application
Any young person, under the age of 18, may apply who has created a significant piece of work in the areas of science, technology, mathematics, music, literature and/or philosophy. 

Selection
Judges, with high levels of expertise in the domain areas of the works submitted, carefully reviewed the qualified applications and selected 17 recipients, 12 Davidson Fellows and 5 Davidson Fellow Laureates.

Results
The following young people were named as Davidson Fellow Laureates and each received a $50,000 scholarship:

  • Wenyi Cai, a 17-year-old from Naperville, Ill. whose technology project was titled Quantitative Analysis of Highly Transient Gasoline Sprays by Time-Resolved Synchroton X-Radiography
  • Sebastian Chang, a 14-year-old from Trabuco Canyon, Calif. whose music portfolio was titled Music Composition, with Performance and Improvisation
  • Allan Chu, a 17-year-old from Saratoga, Calif. whose technology project was titled LZAC Lossless Data Compression: A Novel Approach to Minimum Redundancy Coding
  • Jason Chu, a 16-year-old from Hockessin, Del. whose science project was titled Fibrogenesis Retardation
  • Marcin Mejran, a 16-year-old from Brooklyn, N.Y. whose science/technology project was titled Measuring Transcriptional States with a Highly Parallel Single Molecular Resequencing Approach

The following young people were named as Davidson Fellows and each received a $10,000 scholarship:

  • Jennifer Alyono, a 17-year-old from Silver Spring, Md. whose science/technology project was titled Development of an Electrochemical Biosensor for Phospholipase C Based on Supported Hybrid Lipid
  • Christopher Falzone, a 16-year-old from Richmond, Va. whose music portfolio was titled At the Piano - A Celebration of Human Expression and Creativity
  • Sheel Ganatra, a 17-year-old from Newark, Del. whose mathematics project was titled Escaping a Forest of Circular Mirrors: A Topological Analysis of Phase Spaces
  • Jennifer Hall, a 17-year-old from Mt. Pleasant, S.C. whose literature portfolio was titled Afloat
  • Louis Malcolm Hutson, III, a 17-year-old from Mandeville, La. whose technology project was titled Hashing Algorithms: An Evolutionary Approach
  • Alexandra Morris, a 10-year-old from Ventura, Calif. whose literature portfolio was titled Into the Archway: A Writing Portfolio by Alexandra Morris
  • Ashvin Mysore, a 17-year-old from Louisville, Colo. whose technology project was titled Fractal Terrain Generation with the ROAM Terrain System
  • Alexander Power, a 15-year-old from Cedar Falls, Iowa whose mathematics project was titled On Chromatic Polynomials and the Properties of their Chromatic Growth Ratios
  • Britta Redwood, a 14-year-old from Grapevine, Texas whose literature portfolio was titled The Singing Earth
  • Benjamin Schwartz, a 16-year-old from Wesport, Conn. whose science/technology project was titled A New Tool for the Measurement and Analysis of Grain Boundary Energy with the Atomic Force Microscope
  • Kavita Shukla, a 17-year-old from Ellicott City, Md. whose science project was titled Food Preservation Technology Utilizing Fenugreek (Trigonella Foenum Graecum)
  • Amyie Vuong, a 16-year-old from Oklahoma City, Okla. whose science project was titled Autoimmunity and Cancer

Davidson Fellows were recognized at a special awards ceremony held in Washington , D.C. on September 25, 2002 . The ceremony, held at the Library of Congress, was co-sponsored by Senator Chuck Grassley from Iowa and Senator Harry Reid from Nevada.

Davidson Fellows are encouraged to make a moral commitment to support others and develop their talents. In 2002, three Davidson Fellows were invited to attended the Davidson Young Scholars Gathering held in Golden, Colorado in June. These remarkable young people served as presenters at the Gathering and were able to established relationships with various Young Scholars.    

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Services for Professionals
Provides educators and school administrators with information and services to help them support profoundly gifted learners.

Davidson Institute Educators Guild

The Davidson Institute Educators Guild was launched in October 2002.  Over 150 teachers, school counselors and school/district administrators have joined the Educator’s Guild since its inception.

The Davidson Institute Educators Guild is comprised of teachers, school counselors and school/district administrators who are interested in connecting with colleagues to locate resources and discuss strategies for identifying and serving highly gifted students. Members of the Educators Guild have access to electronic mailing lists and bulletin boards and to the Davidson Institute for Talent Development’s team of professionals who are available to assist with resource location and curriculum development.

In-service Presentations

The Davidson Institute's team of professionals provided in-service trainings and presentations at schools and conferences.

Direct Service
Approximately 800 professionals received assistance via telephone and/or personal contact.

Information Pamphlet
The Davidson Institute distributed approximately 3500  “Could the next Einstein be in your Classroom” information pamphlets to educators and parents. 

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Davidson Gifted Database www.DavidsonGifted.org/DB
Developed by and for profoundly intelligent students, their parents, and the professionals who serve them, this web-based, searchable database provides a wide variety of resources for and about profoundly intelligent young people.

Results Achieved
At the conclusion of 2002, the database contained:

  • 2082 resources for profoundly intelligent young people covering programs, special interests, schools, support organizations and information regarding identification, education, development, and parenting;
  • 2502 comments submitted by members of the profoundly intelligent population; and
  • 280 articles on or about the population.

Since its launch, over 19,746 persons have visited the database to locate resources for the population and/or access information about the population. 

Publications
In 2002, the Davidson Institute produced the following publications:
 

  • Book Review: Iowa Acceleration Scale: A Guide for Whole-Grade Acceleration K-8 (2002) Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Learning Partnership Guidebook. (2002) Davidson Institute for Talent Development
  • Managing the Holidays.  (2002) Davidson Institute for Talent Development
  • Talent Search Opportunities for 2002 (2002) Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Tips for Parents: Gift Ideas for Eager Young Minds. (2002) Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Andis, M. (2002) Tips for Parents: Questions and Answers about Food Selectivity. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Asp, S. (2002) Tips for Parents: Advocacy in Education. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Capurro, M. (2002) Book Review: Raisin' Brains: Surviving My Smart Family. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Capurro, M., Haynes, C., Rasmussen, J. and Asp, S. (2002) Book Review: The Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children: What Do We Know? Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Cook, C. (2002) Book Review: Talent Teenager: The Roots of Success and Failure. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Cronin, A. (2002) Asynchronous Parenting. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Davidson, B. & J. (2002) Is "other worldliness" a characteristic of high intelligence? Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Davidson, J. (2002) The Quiet Crisis in American Education: The Neglect of Highly Intelligent Students. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Delisle, J. (2002) Tips for Parents: Socialization and the Profoundly Gifted (PG) Child. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Gross, M. (2002) Tips for Parents: Radical Acceleration. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Harsin, C. (2002) Book Review: Re-Forming Gifted Education: Matching the Program to the Child. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Haynes, C. (2002) Tips for Parents: Advocacy Resources. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Lind, S. (2002) Tips for Parents: Introverts. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • McGoey, K. (2002) Tips for Parents: Cool, Calm and Collected: Managing Behavior in the Classroom. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Meckstroth, E. (2002) Tips for Parents: Perfectionism and the Profoundly Gifted Child. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Pitman, K. (2002) Book Review: Some of My Best Friends are Books. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Pitman, K. (2002) Tips for Parents: Peer Relations. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Pitman, K. (2002) Tips for Parents: Peer Relations Resources. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Pitman, K. (2002) Tips for Parents: Web Cameras. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Rasmussen, J. (2002) Tips for Parents: Perfectionism. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Rasmussen, J. (2002) Tips for Parents: Perfectionism Resources. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Reider, J. (2002) Tips for Parents: Early College Entrance for Profoundly Gifted Students. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Rimm, S. (2002) Ten Tips for Parenting Gifted Girls. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Rogers, K. (2002) Tips for Parents: Preparing Schools for Your Child. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Sinclair, E. (2002) Tips for Parents: Educational Advocacy. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Swiatek, M. (2002) Social Experiences of Gifted Adolescents. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Warshaw, M. (2002) Meeting the Needs of Twice-Exceptional Children. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Warshaw, M. (2002) Tips for Parents: Homeschooling Twice-Exceptional Children. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.
  • Williams, A. (2002) Summer Programs for Profoundly Intelligent Young People. Davidson Institute for Talent Development.  

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Summary
In 2002, the Davidson Institute for Talent Development expanded both its Davidson Young Scholars program and its Services for Professionals and refined the Davidson Fellows awards and Davidson Gifted Database. 

As of December 2002, the Davidson Institute is providing direct support to 311 profoundly gifted young people. The number of persons who received indirect support via the Services for Professionals, the database and the Institute’s web site is 517,008.

 


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