Davidson Institute - 2003 Annual Report


This is a report of the progress made in 2003 toward achieving the Davidson Institute's mission to recognize, nurture and support profoundly intelligent young people and to provide opportunities for them to develop their talents to make a positive difference.

In pursuit of this mission, the Institute delivered the following programs, services, and publications:

Davidson Young Scholars
An individualized, family-oriented program aimed at nurturing profoundly gifted young people.

Number of Young Scholars Selected in 2003
214 Davidson Young Scholars were selected and enrolled in the program.

Total Number of Young Scholars Currently Enrolled
378 Davidson Young Scholars (121 females; 257 males) from 43 states representing a variety of economic, racial and ethnic groups.

Types of Services Provided
The services provided to the Davidson Young Scholars included:

  • Free consulting services with each Davidson Young Scholar family
  • Assistance with locating appropriate educational settings and materials, advocates, counselors, and mentors
  • Access to professionals in areas such as parenting, schooling, talent development, assessment, etc.
  • Connections with peers for Davidson Young Scholars and their parents
  • Connections with adults who have developed their talents to make a positive contribution to society
  • Group and topic specific list serves for Davidson Young Scholars and their parents
  • Financial Assistance (based upon need) to implement the Davidson Young Scholars Action Plan
  • Online seminars for Davidson Young Scholars, on the following topics:
    • Cory Cerosvek - Early College
    • Roman Tankalovich - Computer Programming and 3-D Graphics
    • Laurens Gunnarsen - Infinite Arithmetic
    • Susan Palwick - Speculative Fiction
    • Glen Finneman - The Space Shuttle as a System
    • Laurens Gunnarsen - Mathematics
    • Brenda Rinard - Mythology
    • Eric Anderson - Game Design
    • Lisa Yee - Writing and Publishing
    • Eric Anderson - Game Programming
  • Online Seminars for Parents, on the following topics:
    • Cory Cerosvek & His Parents - Early College
    • Tom Greenspon - Perfectionism
    • Esther Sinclair - Advocacy
    • Bob Schultz - Adolescence
    • Underachievement - Betsy McCoach
    • Mary Ann Swiatek - Meeting the Needs of Gifted Students through Academic Acceleration
    • Jim Delisle - Risk-Taking and Risk-Making: Understanding when less than perfection is more than acceptable
    • Sharon Lind - Parenting Emotionally-Intense Children
    • Carol Martin - SAT Prep for Gifted Students
    • Jon Reider - Early College Preparation
    • Miraca Gross - Friendship
    • Mary Jacobsen - Gifted Teens
    • Ed Amend - Worry and the Gifted
    • Karen Rogers - Preparing Schools for your Child
    • Barbara Clark - Self-Concept and Self-Esteem
    • Ann Shoplik - Math Talent
    • Fred Frankel - Teasing and Bullying
    • Kara McGoey - Managing Classroom Behavior
    • Sanford Cohn - Smart Boys
  • The Young Scholar East Coast Gathering, “History in the Making” was held in Williamsburg, Virginia in June.
  • The Young Scholar West Coast Gathering, “Exploring New Directions” was held in San Francisco, California in July.

Young Scholars Program Results Achieved
An annual evaluation of the Davidson Young Scholars program was conducted in October, 2003; 200 program participants responded to the survey.

Young Scholar families rated the following major program components for their effectiveness:

  • The Family Consultant team as a knowledgable, supportive sounding board – 100% rated as Effective
  • The Family Consultant Team's ability to provide assistance in a prompt and courteous manner – 100% rated as Effective
  • The Family Consultant Team's ability to provide assistance with the location of resources – 95% rated as Effective
  • The Family Consultant Team's ability to provide a warm, caring individualized relationship – 99% rated as Effective
  • Effectiveness of consultations with outside experts who contract with the Davidson Institute – 97% rated as Effective
  • The Gathering as an opportunity for Young Scholars to connect with each other – 92% rated as Effective
  • The Gathering as an opportunity for parents to connect with each other – 99% rated as Effective
  • The Gathering as an opportunity to better understand the services available through the Young Scholars program – 90% rated as Effective
  • Electronic Mailing Lists and Broadcasts: As a medium for receiving program updates and information – 98% rated as Effective
  • Electronic Mailing Lists and Broadcasts: as a medium for connecting with other Young Scholar families – 85% rated as Effective
  • Parent Bulletin Board, as a way to connect with other Young Scholar parents – 79% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholars Bulletin Board, as a way for Young Scholars to connect with each other – 78% rated as Effective
  • Private Website, as a way to receive program updates and information – 96% rated as Effective
  • Private Website, as a way to connect with and learn about other program participants – 94% rated as Effective
  • Online Seminars, as an opportunity to learn valuable information – 95% rated as Effective
  • Online Seminars, as an opportunity to connect with experts in the field – 96% rated as Effective
  • Davidson Gifted Database, as a convenient, helpful bank of resources – 98% rated as Effective
  • Davidson Gifted Database: As a convenient way to access articles – 99% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholar Seminars: as an opportunity to learn interesting information – 93% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholar Seminars: as an opportunity to connect with a knowledable adult in a specific field – 90% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholar Seminars: as a way to connect with other Young Scholars – 76% rated as Effective

The program participants indicated their level of agreement with the following benefit statements:
As a direct result of participation in the Davidson Young Scholars program, my child...

  • Is now in an academic environment that is better suited to his/her abilities – 87% agree
  • Has an improved level of self-confidence – 93% agreed
  • Is now working to develop his/her interests/talents – 83% agreed
  • Has developed at least one friendship with another Young Scholar – 65% agreed
  • Has shown an interest in using his/her abilities to make a positive difference – 82% agreed

As a direct result of participation as a Young Scholar parent, I feel more confident in my ability to:

  • Advocate for my child – 94% agreed
  • Parent my child – 94% agreed
  • Locate resources for my child – 94% agreed
  • Identify my child's strengths and needs – 94% agreed
  • Address my child's strengths and needs – 93% agreed

Areas of Service
The following information was gathered from our Family Consultants and indicates the number of requests made by Young Scholar families for assistance in the following areas:

  • Educational Advocacy – 325
  • Assistance in locating Professionals for Social/Emotional Support – 158
  • Talent Development & Academic Enrichment – 151
  • Tuition Assistance – 86
  • Home Schooling Support – 66
  • Assessment Consultation & Assistance – 63
  • Financial Assistance – 48
  • Early College Assistance – 30
  • Creation of a Home Schooling Academic Framework – 16

Guidebook Distribution

  • Advocacy Guidebook – 109
  • Early College Guidebook – 65
  • Learning Partnership Guidebook – 26

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Davidson Fellows Awards
Recognizes the outstanding achievements of highly gifted young people and awards scholarships annually to students up to age 18.

Application
Any young person, under the age of 18, may apply who has created a significant piece of work in the areas of science, technology, mathematics, music, literature and/or philosophy

Selection
Judges, with high levels of expertise in the domain areas of the works submitted, carefully reviewed the qualified applications and selected 15 recipients, 4 Davidson Fellow Laureates each receiving a $50,000 scholarship, 6 Davidson Fellows each receiving a $25,000 scholarship, and 5 Davidson Fellows each receiving a $10,000 scholarship.

Results
The following young people were named as Davidson Fellow Laureates and each received a $50,000 scholarship:

  • Devon Guthrie, a 16-year-old from Claremont, California whose music submission was titled An American Quartet: Poet, Composer, Singer & Pianist
  • Daniel Kane, a 17-year-old from Madison, Wisconsin whose mathematical submission was titled Two Papers on the Theory of Partitions
  • Justin Liu, a 17-year-old from Sacramento, California whose science submission was titled Chemokine Receptors and Chemokine Receptor-like Proteins: Prime Candidates for Tyrosine Sulfation
  • Jamie Rubin, a 16-year-old from Fort Meyers, Florida whose science submission was titled Characterization of the Secreted Aspartic Proteinases of C. albicans Using a Combinatorial Approach

The following young people were named as Davidson Fellows and each received a $25,000 scholarship:

  • Timothy Andres, a 17-year-old from Washington, Connecticut whose musical submission was titled Piano Works of Timothy Andres
  • Qilei Hang, a 17-year-old from Cumberland, Maryland whose science submission was titled Optimization of the Location for Two Drawpoint Holes in Conical Stockpiles
  • Anders Kaseorg, a 16-year-old from Charlotte, North Carolina whose mathematical submission was titled The Theory of P-Set Games
  • Pallavi Mahidhara, a 17-year-old from Bethesda, Maryland whose musical submission was titled My Musical Journey with the Piano
  • Michael Snow, a 17-year-old from Woodmere, New York whose science submission was titled The Effect of Inorganic Fillers On Adhesion
  • Irene Sun, a 17-year-old from Indianapolis, Indiana whose science submission was titled Model-Based Gene Expression Analysis of Synovial Cells Under Impulsive Shock

The following young people were named as Davidson Fellows and each received a $10,000 scholarship:

  • Julian Gingold, a 17-year-old from Scarsdale, New York whose science submission was titled Analyzing/Displaying Protein Motion: Variations in Interatomic Distances and Crystallographic B-Factor
  • Tim Lyakhovetskiy, a 17-year-old from Palo Alto, California whose technology submission was titled Stem Engine
  • Keerthi Prabhala, a 17-year-old from Irvine, California whose technology submission was titled Brainwave Derived Electronic Control
  • Arielle Tambini, a 17-year-old from Suffern, New York whose science submission was titled A Comparison of the Neuropsychology of Gulf War Veterans and Civilians Exposed to Pesticides
  • Mandeep Virdi, a 17-year-old from Plainview, New York whose science submission was titled The Synthesis of a Taxoid Porphyrin Conjugate for Selective Drug Delivery

Davidson Fellows were recognized at a special awards ceremony held in Washington, D.C. on September 24, 2003. The ceremony, held at the Library of Congress, was co-sponsored by Senator Chuck Grassley from Iowa and Senator Harry Reid from Nevada

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Educators Guild
Davidson Institute Educators Guild is comprised of teachers, school counselors and school/district administrators who are interested in connecting with colleagues to locate resources and discuss strategies for identifying and serving highly gifted students. Members of the Educators Guild have access to electronic mailing lists and bulletin boards and to the Davidson Institute for Talent Development’s team of professionals who are available to assist with resource location and curriculum development.

318 teachers, school counselors and school/district administrators are members of the Educators Guild.

Information Pamphlet
The Davidson Institute distributed 1743 "Could the next Einstein be in your Classroom" information pamphlets to educators and parents.

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Davidson Gifted Database www.DavidsonGifted.org/DB
Developed by and for profoundly intelligent students, their parents, and the professionals who serve them, this web-based, searchable database provides a wide variety of resources for and about profoundly intelligent young people.

Results Achieved
At the conclusion of 2003, the database contained:

  • 2976 resources for profoundly intelligent young people covering programs, special interests, schools, support organizations and information regarding identification, education, development, and parenting;
  • 3423 comments submitted by members of the profoundly intelligent population; and
  • 378 full-text research and informational articles on or about the population.


Publications
In 2003, the Davidson Institute produced the following publications:

  • Amend, E. Worry and the gifted: How much is too much?
  • Book review by Capurro, M. on Becoming a Master Student by Ellis, D.
  • Book review by Capurro, M. on Cradles of Eminence: Childhoods of More than 700 Famous Men and Women, Second Edition by Goertzel, V., et al
  • Book review by Rasmussen, J. on See Jane Win for Girls: A Smart Girl's Guide to Success by Rimm, S.
  • Book review by Haynes, C. on The New Public School Parent: How to Get the Best Education for Your Child by Chase, B. & Katz, B.
  • Book review by Williams, A. on The Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted Individuals by Delisle, J.
  • Book review by Harsin, C. on Understanding Creativity by Piirto, J.
  • Cerovsek, C. First person perspective on the early college experience
  • Clark, B. Tips for parents - Self concept and self-esteem regarding gifted learners
  • Cohn, S. Tips for parents: Smart boys
  • Delisle, J. Risk-taking and risk-making: Understanding when less than perfection is more than acceptable
  • Frankel, F. Teasing, bullying and the role of friendships: Tips for parents
  • Greenspon, T. Tips for parents on freeing our families from perfectionism
  • Gross, M. Gifted children and friendship: Comments and tips for parents
  • Jacobsen, M. Tips for parents: The real world of gifted teens
  • Lind, S. Tips for parents of emotionally intense children
  • Lind, S. Developing a feeling vocabulary
  • Martin, C. Tips for parents: SAT preparation for the gifted child
  • McGoey, K. Tips for parents: Cool, calm and collected: Managing behavior in the classroom
  • Reider, J. Tips for parents of profoundly gifted children on college admissions
  • Rimm, S. Ten tips for parenting gifted girls
  • Rogers, K. Tips for parents on preparing schools for your child
  • Schultz, R. Tips for parents on highly gifted/profoundly gifted (HG/PG) adolescence
  • Shoplik, A. Parenting mathematically talented students in 7th grade and younger
  • Siegle, D. & McCoach, B. Gifted underachievers: What's a parent to do?
  • Sinclair, E. Tips for parents: Educational advocacy
  • Swiatek, M. Tips for parents on academic acceleration

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Summary
In 2003, the Davidson Institute for Talent Development expanded both its Davidson Young Scholars program and its Educators Guild and refined the Davidson Fellows awards. The Institute also updated its public website and the Davidson Gifted Database.

As of December 2003, the Davidson Institute is providing direct support to 419 profoundly gifted young people. The number of persons who received indirect support via the Educators Guild, Davidson Gifted Database and the Institute’s web site is 589,174.


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