Davidson Institute - 2004 Annual Report


This is a report of the progress made in 2004 toward achieving the Davidson Institute's mission to recognize, nurture and support profoundly intelligent young people and to provide opportunities for them to develop their talents to make a positive difference.

In pursuit of this mission, the Institute delivered the following programs, services, and publications:

Davidson Young Scholars
Davidson Fellows Awards
Educators Guild
Davidson Gifted Database
Publications

Davidson Young Scholars
An individualized, family-oriented program aimed at nurturing profoundly intelligent young people.

Number of Young Scholars Selected in 2004
180 Davidson Young Scholars were selected and enrolled in the program.

Total Number of Young Scholars Enrolled as of December 31, 2004
558 Davidson Young Scholars from 49 states representing a variety of economic, racial and ethnic groups.

Types of Services Provided
The services provided to the Davidson Young Scholars included:

  • Free consulting services with each Davidson Young Scholar family
  • Assistance with locating appropriate educational settings and materials, advocates, counselors, and mentors
  • Access to professionals in areas such as parenting, schooling, talent development, assessment, etc.
  • Connections with peers for Davidson Young Scholars and their parents
  • Connections with adults who have developed their talents to make a positive contribution to society
  • Group and topic specific list serves for Davidson Young Scholars and their parents
  • Financial Assistance (based upon need) to implement the Davidson Young Scholars Action Plan
  • Online seminars for Davidson Young Scholars, on the following topics:
    • Corey Cerosvek - Home Schooling: Going to College Young; Math & Music
    • Thomas Nickels - Creativity and Problem Solving
    • Michael Duff - The Theory Formerly Known as Strings
    • Ron Anderson - Biomechanics of the Eye
    • Brenda Rinard - The Hero Myth in World Literature
    • Don Cohen - Iteration to Infinite Sequences
    • Ken Keller - Fractal Art
    • Anthony Lamanna - Engineering: More than just Math and Science
    • Barbara Luke - Sustainable Development
    • Eric Anderson - Computer Digital Art and Graphics
    • Scott Kim - Mathematical Puzzles
    • Jack Glassman - Lasers: What Are They, How Do They Work?
    • Ayanna Howard - The Inner-workings of a Smart Robot
    • Sherry Werner - Biomechanics in Sports Medicine
    • Paul Spurgeon - LEGO Mindstorms (Beginners)
    • Paul Spurgeon - LEGO Mindstorms (Advanced)
    • Tom Nickles - Some Big Questions of Philosophy: Socrates and Plato
    • Susan Palwick - Populating your Fiction
    • John Sosoka - Inventing and Producing your Invention
  • Online seminars for parents, on the following topics:
    • Paul Beljan - ADD and the Gifted
    • Mary Ann Swiatek - Social Experiences of Gifted Adolescents
    • Paul Beljan - ADD and the Gifted
    • Robert Schultz - Adolescence and the Profoundy Gifted
    • Tom Greenspon - Freeing Our Families from Perfectionism
    • Esther Sinclair - Educational Advocacy
    • Ann Shoplik - Acceleration and the Profoundy Gifted
    • Miraca Gross - The Profoundly Gifted Growing Up
    • Sharon Lind - Introversion
    • Barbara Clark - Understanding the Profoundly Gifted
    • Kara McGoey - How to Keep and Make Friends
    • Jim Delisle - Teenagers
    • Carol Martin - SAT Preparation
    • Jon Reider - Early College
    • Wes Beach - Self-Designed Educational Systems
    • Ed Amend - Assessment
    • Karen Rogers - Preparing Schools for Your Child
    • Ann Shoplik - Parenting the Mathematically Talented Child
    • Brenda Rinard - Reluctant Writer
  • A Young Scholar Regional Gathering was held at the National Robotics Championship in Atlanta, Georgia in April.
  • A Young Scholar Regional Gathering was held at the Mammoth Dig Site in Rapid City, South Dakota in June.
  • A Combined Young Scholar Regional and East Coast Welcome Gathering was held in Chicago, Illinois in June.
  • A West Coast Welcome Gathering was held in San Francisco, California in August.

Young Scholars Program Results Achieved
An annual evaluation of the Davidson Young Scholars program was conducted in October; 293 surveys were received representing 329 Young Scholars.

Young Scholar families rated the following major program components for their effectiveness:

  • The Family Consultant Team as a knowledgable, supportive sounding board – 98% rated as Effective
  • The Family Consultant Team's ability to provide assistance in a prompt and courteous manner – 98% rated as Effective
  • The Family Consultant Team's ability to provide assistance with the location of resources – 96% rated as Effective
  • The Family Consultant Team's ability to provide a warm, caring individualized relationship – 98% rated as Effective
  • Effectiveness of consultations with outside experts who contract with the Davidson Institute – 100% rated as Effective
  • The Gathering as an opportunity for Young Scholars to connect with each other – 96% rated as Effective
  • The Gathering as an opportunity for parents to connect with each other – 99% rated as Effective
  • The Gathering as an opportunity to better understand the services available through the Young Scholars program – 82% rated as Effective
  • Electronic Mailing Lists and Broadcasts as a medium for receiving program updates and information – 98% rated as Effective
  • Electronic Mailing Lists and Broadcasts as a medium for connecting with other Young Scholar families – 94% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholars Parent Bulletin Board as a way to connect with other Young Scholar parents – 76% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholars Bulletin Board as a way for Young Scholars to connect with each other – 76% rated as Effective
  • Private Website as a way to receive program updates and information – 94% rated as Effective
  • Private Website as a way to connect with and learn about other program participants – 92% rated as Effective
  • Online Seminars as an opportunity to learn valuable information – 98% rated as Effective
  • Online Seminars as an opportunity to connect with experts in the field – 98% rated as Effective
  • Davidson Gifted Database as a convenient, helpful bank of resources – 98% rated as Effective
  • Davidson Gifted Database as a convenient way to access articles – 98% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholar Seminars as an opportunity to learn interesting information – 97% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholar Seminars as an opportunity to connect with a knowledable adult in a specific field – 95% rated as Effective
  • Young Scholar Seminars as a way to connect with other Young Scholars – 71% rated as Effective

The program participants indicated their level of agreement with the following benefit statements:
As a direct result of participation in the Davidson Young Scholars program, my child...

  • Is now in an academic environment that is better suited to his/her abilities – 91% agree
  • Has an improved level of self-confidence – 92% agreed
  • Is now working to develop his/her interests/talents – 89% agreed
  • Has developed at least one friendship with another Young Scholar – 74% agreed
  • Has shown an interest in using his/her abilities to make a positive difference – 81% agreed

As a direct result of participation as a Young Scholar parent, I feel more confident in my ability to:

  • Advocate for my child – 97% agreed
  • Parent my child – 96% agreed
  • Locate resources for my child – 96% agreed
  • Identify my child's strengths and needs – 95% agreed
  • Address my child's strengths and needs – 96% agreed

Areas of Service
The following information was gathered from our Family Consultants and indicates the number of requests made by Young Scholar families for assistance in the following areas:

  • Educational Advocacy – 311
  • Assistance in locating Professionals for Social/Emotional Support – 160
  • Talent Development & Academic Enrichment – 123
  • Tuition Assistance – 119
  • Home Schooling Support – 53
  • Assessment Consultation & Assistance – 52
  • Financial Assistance – 83
  • Early College Assistance – 29
  • Creation of a Home Schooling Academic Framework – 12

Guidebook Distribution

  • Advocacy Guidebook – 127
  • Early College Guidebook – 66
  • Learning Partnership Guidebook – 17

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Davidson Fellows Awards
Recognizes the outstanding achievements of highly gifted young people and awards scholarships annually to students up to age 18.

Application
Any young person, under the age of 18, may apply who has created a significant piece of work in the areas of science, technology, mathematics, music, literature and/or philosophy

Selection
Judges, with high levels of expertise in the domain areas of the works submitted, carefully reviewed the qualified applications and selected 15 recipients, 4 Davidson Fellow Laureates each receiving a $50,000 scholarship, 7 Davidson Fellows each receiving a $25,000 scholarship, and 5 Davidson Fellows each receiving a $10,000 scholarship.

Results
The following young people were named as Davidson Fellow Laureates and each received a $50,000 scholarship:

  • Nicole Ali, a 16-year-old from Saint Paul, MN whose science submission was titled Twisted Gastrulation and Chodin Can Aid Primitive Human Hematopoietic Cell Expansion Ex Vivo
  • Jerry Guo, a 16-year-old from Greer, SC whose technology submission was titled Development of an Advanced Bayesian Statistical Spam Filter
  • Rachel Naomi Kudo, a 17-year-old from Northbrook, IL whose music submission was titled For the Love of Music
  • Shuyu Wang, a 17-year-old from East Lansing, MI whose science submission was titled Statistical Mechanics of DNA Bending

The following young people were named as Davidson Fellows and each received a $25,000 scholarship:

  • Athena Adamopoulos, a 17-year-old from New York, NY whose musical submission was titled Expressing the Voice of the Individual in Music
  • Boris Alexeev, a 17-year-old from Athens, GA whose Mathematics submission was titled Minimal Space DFA's for Testing Divisibility
  • Molly Carr, a 17-year-old from Reno, NV whose music submission was titled Music "Heaven Breaking in on Us"
  • Matthew Goldstein, a 17-year-old from Delmar, NY whose technology submission was titled DoorManBot: Instant Message Relaying for Offling Users
  • Harish Khandrika, a 17-year-old from La Jolla, CA whose science submission was titled Analysis of X-Rays from the Core of Radio-Galaxy Centaurus A
  • Natasha Simanova, a 17-year-old from Huntingdon, PA whose literature submission was titled The Renaissance: But Victual of Voracious Change
  • April Wang, a 17-year-old from Cincinnati, OH whose literature submission was titled Who Am I?

The following young people were named as Davidson Fellows and each received a $10,000 scholarship:

  • Ann Chi, a 17-year-old from Terre Haute, IN whose science submission was titled H2 and C2H4 Elimination Pathways in the Y+
  • Illya Filshtinskiy, a 17-year-old from Westerville, OH whose music submission was titled A Step Toward my Dream
  • Lee Huttner, a 15-year-old from Pittsburgh, PA whose philosophy submission was titled The Religio-Spiritual Impulse and its Biological Inherence in Humans
  • Anna-Katrina Shedletsky, a 17-year-old from Brewster, NY whose science submission was titled Disease Propagation Through Connective
  • Stephanie Tse, a 17-year-old from Los Angeles, CA whose science submission was titled SNP Detection of a 410bp Region of the MTRR Promoter in Colorectal Adenoma Patients

Davidson Fellows were recognized at a special awards ceremony held in Washington, D.C. on September 29, 2004. The ceremony, held at the Library of Congress, was co-sponsored by Senator Chuck Grassley from Iowa and Senator Harry Reid from Nevada

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Educators Guild
Davidson Institute Educators Guild is comprised of teachers, school counselors and school/district administrators who are interested in connecting with colleagues to locate resources and discuss strategies for identifying and serving highly gifted students. Members of the Educators Guild have access to electronic mailing lists and bulletin boards and to the Davidson Institute for Talent Development’s team of professionals who are available to assist with resource location and curriculum development.

500 teachers, school counselors and school/district administrators are members of the Educators Guild.

Information Pamphlet
The Davidson Institute distributed 557 "Could the next Einstein be in your Classroom" information pamphlets to educators and parents.

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Davidson Gifted Database www.DavidsonGifted.org/DB
Developed by and for profoundly intelligent students, their parents, and the professionals who serve them, this web-based, searchable database provides a wide variety of resources for and about profoundly intelligent young people.

Results Achieved
At the conclusion of 2004, the database contained:

  • 3485 resources for profoundly intelligent young people covering programs, special interests, schools, support organizations and information regarding identification, education, development, and parenting;
  • 4258 comments submitted by members of the profoundly intelligent population; and
  • 432 full-text research and informational articles on or about the population.

Publications
In 2004, the Davidson Institute produced the following publications:

  • Amend, E. Tips for parents: Individual assessment of gifted children
  • Book review by Bynum, J. on Radical Acceleration of Highly Gifted Children by Gross, M. and van Vliet, H.
  • Book review by Harsin, C. on Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnonis of Gifted Children and Adults by Webb, J., Amend, E., Webb, N., Goerrs, J., Beljan, P., & Olenchak, R.
  • Book review by Haynes C. on Developing Mathetmatical Talent by Assouline, S. & Lupkowski-Shoplik, A.
  • Book review by Haynes C. on The Difficult Child by Turecki, S.
  • Book review by Johnson, J. on Empowering Gifted Minds: Educational Advocacy that Works by Gilman, B.
  • Book review by Smith, N. on Stand Up for your Gifted Child by Smutny, J.M.
  • Book review by Sotak, J. on When Gifted Kids Don't Have All the Answers by Delisle, J.
  • Beach, W. Tips for parents: Self-designed educational programs
  • Beljan, P. Tips for parents: ADD and the gifted
  • Clark, B. Tips for parents: Helping parents understand their profoundly gifted children
  • Cohn, S. Tips for parents: Smart boys
  • Delisle, J. Tips for parents: Gifted...and teenage, too
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Best practices of schools that nurture excellence
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Educational options for gifted learners
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Explore the red planet from home
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Gifted-friendly parenting strategies
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Homeschooling tips
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Parenting tips on educational advocacy
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Parenting tips:Finding a learning guide for your gifted son/daughter
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Recommended readings on educational advocacy
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Recommended readings on friendship
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Research highlights from Templeton National Acceleration Report
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development Tips for forming a learning partnership
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development What the research says about gifted learners
  • Greenspon, T. Tips for parents: Freeing our families from perfectionism
  • Gross, M.Tips for parents: Profoundly gifted growing up
  • Martin, C. Tips for parents: SAT preparation for the gifted child (2005)
  • McGoey, K. Tips for parents: How to make and keep friends - promoting pro-social behavior
  • Reider, J. Tips for parents: Early college entrance for profoundly gifted students (2004)
  • Rinard, B. Tips for parents: The reluctant writer
  • Rogers, K. Tips for parents: Preparing the schools for your child
  • Schultz, R. Traversing the straits of adolescence: A guide for parents of profoundly gifted teens
  • Shoplik, A. Acceleration and the profoundly gifted: Tips for parents
  • Shoplik, A. Tips for parents: Parenting mathematically talented students
  • Siegle, D. & McCoach, D.B.What you can do to reverse underachievement in your classroom
  • Swiatek, M. Tips for parents: Social experiences of gifted adolescent
  • Vanderkam, L. Book group discussion questions for Genius Denied: How to stop wasting our brightest young minds

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As of December 2004, the Davidson Institute is providing direct support to 615 profoundly gifted young people. The number of persons who received indirect support via the Educators Guild, the Davidson Gifted Database and the Institute’s web site is over 500,000.


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