Davidson Institute - 2005 Annual Report



This is a report of the progress made in 2005 toward achieving the Davidson Institute's mission to recognize, nurture and support profoundly intelligent young people and to provide opportunities for them to develop their talents to make a positive difference.

In pursuit of this mission, the Institute delivered the following programs, services and publications:

Davidson Young Scholars
Davidson Fellows Awards
THINK Summer Institute
Educators Guild
Davidson Gifted Database
Publications
Newsletters

Davidson Young Scholars
An individualized program aimed at nurturing profoundly intelligent young people.

Number of Young Scholars Selected in 2005
232 Davidson Young Scholars were selected and enrolled in the program.

7 Davidson Young Scholars turned 18 in 2005 and became Young Scholar Alumni.

Total Number of Young Scholars Enrolled as of December 31, 2005
791 Davidson Young Scholars from 48 states representing a variety of economic, racial and ethnic groups.

Types of Services Provided
The services provided to the Davidson Young Scholars included:

  • Free consulting services with each Davidson Young Scholar family
  • Assistance with locating appropriate educational settings and materials, advocates, counselors and mentors
  • Access to professionals in areas such as parenting, schooling, talent development, assessment, etc.
  • Connections with peers for Davidson Young Scholars and their parents
  • Connections with adults who have developed their talents to make a positive contribution to society
  • Group and topic specific list serves for Davidson Young Scholars and their parents
  • Financial assistance (based upon need) to assist Davidson Young Scholars with accessing educational and talent development opportunities
  • Online seminar topics for Davidson Young Scholars:
    • Ken Keller - Fractal Art
    • Paul Spurgeon - More MindStorms
    • John Sosoka - Inventing and Producing Your Invention
    • Paul Spurgeon - Simulations & Chaos
    • Jack Glassman - Fermi Problems
    • The Purdue Aeronautics & Astronautics Team - Rocket Propulsion
    • Bryan Bates - Ancient Astronomy
    • Scott Kim - Mathematical Puzzles
    • Wes Beach - Create Your Own Path to College Admission
    • Bullying - Tom Letson
    • Susan Palwick - Six Days in Middle Earth (Lord of the Rings)
    • Tonya Witherspoon - Stop-Motion-Action! Creating Clay Animation Movies
    • Glen Finneman - The World a System of Systems
    • Anthony Bennette - Revised SAT - Intro to English and Language Writing Section
    • Scott Mensing - Global Climate Change
    • Roxane Wilson - Perspective Drawing
    • Eric Anderson - Computer Digital Art and Graphics
    • Tonya Witherspoon - Engineering Design: Creating Robotics Projects
  • Online seminar topics for parents:
    • Sylvia Rimm - Parenting Your Gifted Child
    • Ann Shoplik - Acceleration
    • Wes Beach - Self-designed Educational Systems
    • Tom Greenspon - Freeing our Families from Perfectionism
    • Bob Schultz - Adolescence and the Profoundly Gifted
    • Miraca Gross - Friendships of Exceptionally and Profoundly Gifted Children
    • Sharon Lind - Introversion
    • Esther Sinclair - Advocacy 101
    • Kara McGoey - Collaborating with School Personnel
    • Esther Sinclair - Advocacy 102
    • Carol Martin - SAT Preparation
    • Fred Frankel - The Role of Friendships in Life Challenges for Gifted and Talented Children
    • Mary Ann Swiatek - Social Experiences of Gifted Adolescents
    • Carol Martin - Writing and the Gifted Child
    • Jessica Fields - Young Scientists in the Making
    • Tonya Witherspoon - A Parent’s Guide for Using Technology with Gifted Children
    • Tom Letson - Bullying
    • Kara McGoey - Cool, Calm & Collected: Managing Behavior in the Classroom
    • Miraca Gross - Friendships and the Profoundly Gifted
  • A Young Scholar Gathering was held in Denver, Colorado in June, visiting the Museum of Science and Nature.
  • A Young Scholar Regional Gathering was held in San Diego, California in June, visiting the Burnham Institute.
  • A Young Scholar Gathering was held in College Park, Maryland in August, visiting the National Security Agency.
Young Scholars Program Results Achieved
An annual evaluation of the Davidson Young Scholars program was conducted in October; 556 surveys were received representing 616 Young Scholars. Young Scholar families rated the following major program components for their effectiveness:
  • The Family Consultant Team as a knowledgeable, supportive sounding board: 97% rated as effective
  • The Family Consultant Team's ability to provide assistance in a prompt and courteous manner: 99% rated as effective
  • The Family Consultant Team's ability to provide assistance with the location of resources: 96% rated as effective
  • The Family Consultant Team's ability to provide a warm, caring individualized relationship; 97% rated as effective
  • Effectiveness of consultations with outside experts who contract with the Davidson Institute: 91% rated as effective
  • The Gathering as an opportunity for Young Scholars to connect with each other: 95% rated as effective
  • The Gathering as an opportunity for parents to connect with each other: 97% rated as effective
  • The Gathering as an opportunity to better understand the services available through the Young Scholars program: 86% rated as effective
  • Electronic Mailing Lists and Broadcasts as a medium for receiving program updates and information: 98% rated as effective
  • Electronic Mailing Lists and Broadcasts as a medium for connecting with other Young Scholar families: 96% rated as effective
  • Young Scholars Parent Bulletin Board as a way to connect with other Young Scholar parents: 83% rated as effective
  • Young Scholars Bulletin Board as a way for Young Scholars to connect with each other: 81% rated as effective
  • Private Website as a way to receive program updates and information: 93% rated as effective
  • Private Website as a way to connect with and learn about other program participants: 91% rated as effective
  • Online Seminars as an opportunity to learn valuable information: 95% rated as effective
  • Online Seminars as an opportunity to connect with experts in the field: 96% rated as effective
  • Young Scholar Seminars as an opportunity to learn interesting information: 93% rated as effective
  • Young Scholar Seminars as an opportunity to connect with a knowledgeable adult in a specific field: 90% rated as effective
  • Young Scholar Seminars as a way to connect with other Young Scholars: 63% rated as effective
The program participants indicated their level of agreement with the following benefit statements:
As a direct result of participation in the Davidson Young Scholars program, my child...
  • Is now in an academic environment that is better suited to his/her abilities: 89% agree
  • Has an improved level of self-confidence: 91% agreed
  • Is now working to develop his/her interests/talents: 89% agreed
  • Has developed at least one friendship with another Young Scholar: 75% agreed
  • Has shown an interest in using his/her abilities to make a positive difference: 84% agreed
As a direct result of participation as a Young Scholar parent, I feel more confident in my ability to:
  • Advocate for my child: 95% agreed
  • Parent my child: 93% agreed
  • Locate resources for my child: 95% agreed
  • Identify my child's strengths and needs: 93% agreed
  • Address my child's strengths and needs: 92% agreed

Areas of Service
The following information was gathered from our Family Consultants and indicates the number of requests made by Young Scholar families for assistance in the following areas:
  • Educational Advocacy: 422
  • Assistance in locating Professionals for Social/Emotional Support: 224
  • Talent Development and Academic Enrichment: 160
  • Home Schooling Support: 54
  • Assessment Consultation and Assistance: 41
  • Early College Assistance: 36
  • Creation of a Homeschooling Academic Framework: 47
Financial Assistance was provided to 134 Davidson Young Scholars.

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Davidson Fellows Awards
Recognizes the outstanding achievements of highly gifted young people and awards scholarships annually to students up to age 18.

Application
Any young person, under the age of 18, may apply who has created a significant piece of work in the areas of Science, Technology, Mathematics, Music, Literature, Philosophy or Outside the Box.

Selection
Judges, with high levels of expertise in the domain areas of the works submitted, carefully reviewed the qualified applications and selected 17 recipients; 4 Davidson Fellow Laureates each receiving a $50,000 scholarship, 5 Davidson Fellows each receiving a $25,000 scholarship, and 8 Davidson Fellows each receiving a $10,000 scholarship.

Results
The following young people were named as Davidson Fellow Laureates and each received a $50,000 scholarship:
  • Karsten Gimre, a 12-year-old from Banks, Oregon whose Music submission was titled, “Conversation Without Words.”
  • Heidi Kaloustian, a 17-year-old from Canton, Michigan whose Literature submission was titled, “The Roots Of All Things.”
  • Tiffany Ko, a 16-year-old from Terre Haute, Indiana whose Technology submission was titled, “Designing a Capacitance-Based Security System Employing the MC33794 E-Field Sensor Chip.”
  • Milana Zaurova, a 17-year-old from Fresh Meadows, New York whose Science submission was titled, “Gene Therapy Meets Chemotherapy: Exposure of Malignant Glioma Cells to Transgenic Embryonic Stem Cells and Temozolomide.”
The following young people were named as Davidson Fellows and each received a $25,000 scholarship:
  • Maia Cabeza, a 12-year-old from Chapel Hill, North Carolina whose Music submission was titled, “Sharing Music With People Around The World.”
  • Brett Harrison, a 16-year-old from Dix Hills, New York whose Mathematics submission was titled, “A Proof of Seymour's Conjecture for All Oriented Graphs.”
  • Tudor Dominik Maican, a 16-year-old from Bethesda, Maryland whose Music submission was titled, “Symphonieta for String Orchestra, Reflections on James Joyce, D'un Monde a l'autre.”
  • Justin Solomon, a 17-year-old from Oakton, Virginia whose Technology submission was titled, “Identification of Differential Surface Properties on a Triangle Mesh for Facial & Object Recognition.”
  • John Zhou, a 16-year-old from Northville, Michigan whose Science submission was titled, “A Study of Possible Interactions Among Rev1, Rev3 and Rev7 Proteins from Saccharomyces Cerevisiae.”
The following young people were named as Davidson Fellows and each received a $10,000 scholarship:
  • Kadir Annamalai, a 17-year-old from Saratoga, California whose Science submission was titled, “Growth of Germanium Nanowires through the Vapor Liquid Solid Mechanism.”
  • Stephanie Hon, a 17-year-old from Fort Myers, Florida whose Science submission was titled, “The Effects of Intracerebroventricular Passive Immunization on the Deposition of Beta-Amyloid.”
  • Benedict Shan Yuan Huang, a 17-year-old from Coram, New York whose Science submission was titled, “Changed Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions.”
  • Lucas Moller, a 16-year-old from Moscow, Idaho whose Science submission was titled, “Static and Dynamic Analysis of Mars Dust: Application to Mars Exploration.”
  • Nimish Ramanlal, a 16-year-old from Winter Springs, Florida whose Technology submission was titled, “Programmable Quantum Computing: A New Framework with Von Neumann Type Architecture.”
  • Tony Wu, a 16-year-old from Irvine, California whose Technology submission was titled, “A Category Oriented Web Search Engine Based On Round Robin Learning And Ranking Algorithm.”
  • Fan Yang, a 17-year-old from Davis, California whose Science submission was titled, “Identification of Bacterial Adhesion Antagonists for Contact Lenses & Intraocular Lenses.”
  • Marc Yu, a 6-year-old from Monterey Park, California whose Music submission was titled, “Performance Selections for Piano.”
Davidson Fellows were recognized at a special awards ceremony held in Washington, D.C. on September 28, 2005. The ceremony, held at the Library of Congress, was co-sponsored by Senator Harry Reid from Nevada and Senator Chuck Grassley from Iowa.

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THINK Summer Institute
Three-week residential summer program on the campus of University of Nevada, Reno, where students can earn up to seven transferable college credits.

Application
Applicants must demonstrate both exceptional ability and the potential to benefit from the course offerings, as well as the social and emotional maturity to thrive in this three-week residential environment.

Selection
To be eligible for the THINK Summer Institute, applicants must be 12-15 years old and be a U.S. citizen or permanent U.S. resident living in the United States. Applicants must also submit a qualifying score on the SAT or ACT.

Results
Eighteen students attended in 2005 and had the choice of taking Chemistry 392 or Philosophy 101 in the morning and Spanish 111 or Communications 113 in the afternoon. The average GPA was 3.5.

Evaluations for THINK Summer Instiute 2005

Course Evaluations Chemistry
6 of 7 students
responded
Philosophy
9 of 11 students responded
Spanish
6 of 8 students
responded
Comm
7 of 10 students
responded
The material presented in class was just right 83% 100% 83% 85%
The textbook was just right 100% 88% 100% 71%
The homework was relevant and helped me learn 100% 100% 100% 100%
The pace of the class was just right 100% 77% 83% 71%
In this class, I learned a lot or a moderate amount 100% 100% 83% 85%
In general, I enjoyed this course 100% 100% 100% 85%
The chemistry laboratory experiences were just right 66% N/A N/A N/A

Professor Evaluation Chemistry
6 of 7 students
responded
Philosophy
9 of 11 students responded
Spanish
6 of 8 students
responded
Comm
7 of 10 students
responded
The professor was well prepared for class 100% 100% 100% 100%
The professor showed concern for how well I learned the material 100% 100% 100% 100%
The homework was relevant and helped me learn 100% 100% 100% 100%
I gained a lot from interacting with the professor 100% 100% 100% 71%
The professor’s teaching style was a good match for the way I learn 100% 77% 100% 71%
The professor made the class interesting 100% 100% 100% 71%


In addition, 100% of the respondents said they:
  • Enjoyed living on campus
  • Developed a clearer understanding of what to expect in college
  • Felt the THINK experience made them feel more confident as a student
  • Formed at least one friendship with a fellow THINKer
  • Enjoyed the extracurricular events (such as:Shakespeare at Sand Harbor, Reno Philharmonic Concert, Great Basin Chautauqua)
  • Felt the overall experience with THINK was positive
  • Would return to THINK Summer Institute next year


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Educators Guild
Davidson Institute Educators Guild is comprised of teachers, school counselors and school/district administrators who are interested in connecting with colleagues to locate resources and discuss strategies for identifying and serving highly gifted students. Members of the Educators Guild have access to electronic mailing lists and bulletin boards, and to the Davidson Institute for Talent Development’s team of professionals who are available to assist with resource location and curriculum development. Online seminars for Educators Guild members were added in 2005.

Educator Guild members received two newsletters, one in the fall and one in the spring, with a wealth of information about meeting the needs of gifted learners.

1,066 teachers, school counselors and school/district administrators are members of the Educators Guild.

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Davidson Gifted Database
www.DavidsonGifted.org/DB
Your gateway to gifted news and resources is an online, searchable database providing the latest information for and about profoundly intelligent young people.

Results Achieved
At the conclusion of 2005, the database contained:
  • 3,519 resources covering support and assessment organizations, schools, summer programs, printed material, web and media tools
  • 448 full-text research and informational articles on or about identification, gifted education, development and parenting
  • 972 comments submitted by members of the profoundly intelligent population

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Publications
In 2005, the Davidson Institute produced the following publications:
  • Beach, W., Tips for parents: Some thoughts about college admission
  • Book Review by Haynes, C., A Mind At A Time, Levine, M.
  • Book Review by Harsin, C., Losing our minds: Gifted children left behind, Ruf, D.
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Boise School District: A continuum of services
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Des Moines Public Schools: Leading the state that leads the nation in gifted ed
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Does No Child Left Behind Require That No Child Can Get Ahead?
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Fostering Philanthropic Values
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, How parent advocacy groups can make a difference: An interview with Christine Smith
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, How parent advocacy groups can make a difference: An interview with Debbie Kring and Juli Moseley
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Mentors who make a difference: Dr. Allan Dennis
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Mentors who make a difference: Ken Ono, Ph.D.
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Middle Years Scholars Program: Success in public education
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Straight talk: Helping bright teens through tough times
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Teacher to teacher
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Teacher to teacher: Acceleration - It's free and it works!
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Teacher to teacher: Conducting informal assessments
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, The teacher-parent connection
  • Davidson Institute for Talent Development, Uncover federal aid for early entry college students
  • Davidson, J., Twelve cost effective educational options for serving gifted students
  • Davidson, J., Vanderkam, L., Helping gifted students help schools
  • Fields, J., Tips for parents: Young scientists in the making
  • Frankel, F., Tips for parents: The role of friendships in life challenges for gifted and talented children
  • Greenspon, T., Tips for parents: Freeing our families from perfectionism (2005)
  • Gross, M., Tips for parents: Gifted children's friendships
  • Letson, T., Tips for parents: What to do about bullying
  • Lind, S., Tips for parents: Introverts (2005)
  • Lupkowski-Shoplik, A., Tips for parents: Acceleration
  • McGoey, K., Tips for parents: Collaborating with school personnel: Strategies for successful partnering
  • Rimm, S., Tips for parents: Summary of tips for parents of gifted children
  • Schultz, R., Tips for parents: Highly gifted/profoundly gifted (HG/PG) adolescent (2005)
  • Sinclair, E., Tips for parents: Educational advocacy (2005)
  • Sinclair, E., Tips for parents: Advanced educational advocacy
  • Swiatek, M., Tips for parents: Social experiences of gifted adolescents (2005)

In 2005, the Davidson Institute updated these guidebooks and made them available online, free of charge:
  • Advocating for Exceptionally Gifted Young People: A Guidebook
  • Considering the Options: A Guidebook for Investigating Early College Entrance – Student Version
  • Considering the Options: A Guidebook for Investigating Early College Entrance – Parent Version

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Newsletters

In 2005, the Davidson Institute published the following newsletters:
  • January Davidson Institute eNews-Update
  • January Genius Denied Newsletter
  • February Davidson Institute eNews-Update
  • March Davidson Institute eNews-Update
  • March Genius Denied Newsletter
  • Spring Educators Guild Newsletter (PDF version)
  • April Davidson Institute eNews-Update
  • May Genius Denied Newsletter
  • Fall Educators Guild Newsletter (PDF version)
  • October Davidson Institute eNews-Update
  • December Davidson Institute eNews-Update

 

 


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Summary
As of the end of December 2005, the Davidson Institute is providing direct support to 883 profoundly gifted young people; 1,066 educators, and 600,000 people who received indirect support via the Institute’s electronic broadcasts and websites.

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